Aldeah Avenue – Arts & Crafts Style Bungalow

At the end of Aldeah Avenue you will find a modest grey-toned bungalow with a red front door. Stick around long enough and you may just see a beagle named Wyatt run out into the front yard to greet you. Avid bikers and DIYers Carrie and Jonathan are the owners of this 1926 bungalow. It doesn’t take long after sitting down with these two to grasp their appreciation for its history and the strong love they keep for their home.

Their home now with Wyatt hanging out on the new front walkway

Their home currently with Wyatt hanging out on the new front walkway

Horace and Ruth Wren were the original builders. At the time the home was valued around $4000. Horace was the owner of The Recreation Barber Shop located in downtown Columbia. Sadly though, a few years later in 1935 the Wrens were forced to move from their home due to the affects of the Great Depression causing Horace to lose his business. From there on out after the Wren’s lost the home, the bungalow became a rental property and later switched to owner-occupied. Before Carrie and Jonathan purchased the bungalow in April of 2012, the home had been flipped quickly and cheaply without much consideration of its history. Overlooking the work needed to return the home to its original form, the two fell in love with the bungalow. Carrie remembers thinking that the place was the cutest when they bought it, though they look back now and consider, “What were we thinking?” They find it hard to comprehend what they saw in the bungalow with the contrast of how it looks now.

The house before

The house before

Neither Carrie nor Jonathan have ever renovated a home before. Jonathan has helped others with renovations but never to this extent, and Carrie, who previously held the position of Director of the District, has a great love of historic preservation. Both aspire to bring back the character of the bungalow through close attention to historical detail.

The home upon purchase wasn’t in terrible condition. The foundation had already been addressed and the home in general had been kept up fairly well. However, cheap vinyl siding in a hue of mint green covered the exterior and the rooms ranged from shades of light pinkish-grey to deep blues. Jonathan, with a sigh says about the move in condition of the home, “The bones were good.”

Carrie says the main focus when renovating their home has been about “respecting the history of the house and respecting the era of the house.” Early on in the renovation process, much of their focus went towards picking out proper colors for the exterior and interior. They looked to Sherwin Williams Arts & Crafts colors when deciding. After going through an online poll between Carrie and Jonathan’s two paint choices, and having their friend Photoshop their home to “test out” the colors, they finally decided on a Bunglehouse Grey for the body of the home. It took them roughly six months to decide on the color and about four days for the home to be painted. That is the type of dedication these two have when it comes to renovating their historic home. No detail is overlooked.

About a year in, the home was landscaped with help from Carrie’s father. The electrical was also a very concerning issue shortly after moving in. Jonathan, having experience in wiring, took over when it came to fixing this situation. The breaker box was outdated and lacked the capability for additional breakers to be added. After fixing the necessary electrical issues and potential gas problem due to a flexible copper pipe, the two made one of their first big investments. Hardie board shingles were installed in the gable on the front of the home. Before, it was covered in grey cheap siding that didn’t go with the home’s era whatsoever. The shingles were staggered to add a more whimsical appearance while still keeping with the historic element.

The shingles in progress

The shingles in progress

The front walkway was also redone in April of 2014 due to the bricks being uneven with weeds growing in between. New steps to the front porch were added after the old ones caved in around Thanksgiving time. The back patio with its brick, gravel, and slopping cement was also given much needed attention. The screened in porch in the back was redone with half of it becoming a seating area and the back half occupying their collection of bikes.

Carrie and Jonathan try to take on as much of the renovation work themselves as they possibly can. Carrie remarks of their DIY efforts, “How much can we actually do on our own?” In response to that, I would say a lot. The home is welcoming upon entry, with furniture suited to the size of the rooms and a color scheme of earth tones, all in keeping with the era of the Arts & Crafts bungalow. The doorknobs, previously being dysfunctional cheap brass plates with glass knobs, have been replaced with oil rubbed bronze plates and knobs, still distinctive of the time period. Even all the light switches and outlets match the hardware. Outside on the front patio and back patios you will find unique lights designed by Old California Lantern Company. This company, located in Orange, California, specializes in Arts and Crafts style lights that are made by hand. The lights, being hand crafted, stand out. They are not mass-produced but made with dedication to the craft. Carrie and Jonathan are all about craftsmanship. Carrie says of the lights, “Back when bungalows and arts and crafts were big you would have artisans who did this stuff, and now you still do.”

The front porch light from Old California Lantern Company

The front porch light from Old California Lantern Company

The back porch light

The back porch light

It’s not just the historic aspects of this home that makes Carrie and Jonathan love where they live so much; it’s the neighborhood as well. On Aldeah, the homes were designed with the neighbor in mind, demonstrated by the alignment of the porches. Jonathan says they can stand on their porch and easily talk to their neighbors on either side of them. He comments on the neighborhood, “You can’t get away with not knowing your neighbors,” and that’s especially true when you share a driveway. Long lasting friendships have been created due to the closeness of the homes. They know basically everyone on their street. Aldeah is lined with bungalows and homes older than 50 years. It appears that the people of this neighborhood truly care about the history of the area and seem to want to maintain it properly. It’s sort of like a historic treasure in a society that always strives for the latest, newest thing.

aldeah

Figure 13. from Garth Addition survey. More info on this addition may be found here!  

Carrie and Jonathan love their home with a great passion. They are aware that it is small with only 900 square feet, but they feel that they have all they really need. In response to having a larger home with unnecessary space and rooms, Jonathan made the remark, “I mean I would have rooms dedicated to stuff, and when I say stuff, I mean like… bears. A bear room. I would have a grizzly bear in a room. “ Carrie responds with, “Oh Wyatt would like that.” They are happy with their cozy bungalow and they should be. Their renovations thus far have changed the home from quick-fixer-upper to beautifully redone bungalow. The Wrens would be proud.

For more information regarding the bungalow, visit Carrie and Jonathan’s blog at comobungalow.com!

Carrie and Jonathan

Carrie and Jonathan

** Pictures were taken by the property owners and can be found on their blog.

** Currently a neighborhood plan is in progress for this area which includes Aldeah Avenue. The City of Columbia’s neighborhood planning process helps neighborhoods identify their specific needs and priorities helping to guide future development and redevelopment. Additional information concerning this planning effort may be found here!

Garth’s Addition to Columbia

Garth Addition

The Garth Addition

McBaine Avenue, West Ash Street, West Broadway, and West Boulevard surround what is known as the Garth Addition, a neighborhood filled with early 20th century housing. Jefferson Garth, a notable Columbia, Missouri citizen, originally obtained this parcel in 1836 from William Jewell. Most of the homes located within this addition still retain their historical integrity, making the area as a whole appear somewhat unaltered by the changing times. In 2005, the Historic Preservation Commission received a grant from the State Historic Preservation Office to commission a survey of the area’s properties. The Garth’s Addition Historical Survey was submitted in June of 2006. The purpose of the inventory is to determine the eligibility of the neighborhood and its properties to be added to the National Register of Historic Places. The survey also provides a historical narrative useful for understanding the influences and character of the neighborhood (this information is presently being used in the development of a Neighborhood Plan for the West Central Area of Columbia). There are 241 properties in the Garth’s Addition, with at least 14 having lost their integrity due to significant modifications, or are less than 50 years old, thus not adding to the historical character.

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An aerial view of Columbia in 1869 by Albert Ruger.

At the turn of the 20th century, this area was still considered rural. After Jefferson Garth purchased the area, he turned it into a 600-acre farm, which in the 1880s partly became located within the suburbs of Columbia. By 1917 it was subdivided approximately in half into smaller lots for individual housing. The construction of the homes within the addition suggests that it was very middle-class in character.

Bungalow

An example of a Bungalow at 123 Anderson Avenue in the Garth Addition.

Large Bungalow

This home at 108 N Glenwood Avenue is an example of a large Bungalow.

The surveyed area mainly contains homes built between 1925 and 1955. The three most common styles in the addition are Craftsman, Tudor Revival, and Ranch styles, though there are also findings of American Foursquare, Queen Anne, Colonial Revival, and Dutch Revival homes. The Craftsman-style Bungalow is the dominant architectural style of the neighborhood. This style was very popular in the US between 1905 and 1930 during the Arts-and-Crafts movement, which looked more towards local workmanship and protested industrialism. The bungalows found in the addition are mainly brick and of moderate size with gable front plans and prominent porches supported by tapered piers and/or brick and stucco posts. The larger styles seen on Anderson and Greenwood Avenue in the area feature large overhanging eaves, wide porches, sloping rooflines, and multi-pane, colorful glass above windows and doors.

Tudor Revival

118 Anderson Avenue is a prime example of a Tudor Revival with its large exterior brick chimney.

Ranch

This home at 109 Meadow Lane is a Ranch style dwelling.

The Tudor Revival style became popular in America in the early-to-mid twentieth century through the introduction of balloon frame construction, which was most affordable at the time. Many of the homes in the neighborhood featuring this style were built between the 1930s and early 1940s. This style features exterior finishes with concrete stucco, half timbers in the gable fields, multi-sash leaded casement windows, large exterior brick or stone chimneys, arched windows, and vertical plank doors. The Ranch style, constructed in the neighborhood between the 40s and 60s, in which the area was already established as a residential district, replaced the bungalow as the most common housing style in America after World War II. These homes feature low-pitched rooflines, picture windows, and often an attached garage wing. Most of these homes can be seen west of Aldeah Avenue.

Dutch Revival

This home at 19 Anderson Avenue is an example of a Dutch Revival with its most prominent feature being the gambrel roof.

AM Foursquare

709 W Broadway is an example of an American Foursquare home.

The Colonial and Dutch Revivals can be found throughout the addition as well. The Colonial became popular in the late 19th century and into the early 20th century with the Dutch Revival popularized in the early 20th century. The Colonial features elements of Greek, Federal, and Italian influences with an emphasis on symmetrically placed windows and doors. The entrances of these homes are of classical surrounds with pediments, columned porches, and sidelights/transoms. Gabled dormers and Palladian windows are also found in this style. Dutch Revivals can be recognized by their gambrel roofs with entrances similar to that of the Colonial Revival and Craftsman-style homes. Another early 20th century residential style found in the neighborhood is the American Foursquare. This home is known for its unmistakably square plan resting on a solid foundation of brick or stone. Typically two-and-one-half stories, it features a hip roof and hipped roofline dormer, usually with one at each elevation. The porch is either centrally featured or a wraparound.

Last but not least, the most ornate architectural style of home found in the Garth’s Addition area is the Queen Anne. Though this is the least common style found in the addition, its heavy embellishments, decorative millwork, and turrets help it to really stand out. Popularized by rapid industrial growth and development during the late 19th century and into the turn of the 20th century, builders began to gain easier access to inexpensive and machine-made materials due to the railroad quickly transporting goods to local markets. These ornate homes also feature wrap-around porches, patterned masonry, stained glass lights, and ornamental gable and porch details.

Queen Anne

703 W Broadway features many characteristics of the Queen Anne style of architecture.

As previously stated, most of these various architectural style homes are still in great condition and still reflecting their historic period of construction. An option to help continue the Garth Addition’s reflection of its early days, according to the survey, may be identifying the area as a historic district and seeking National Register of Historic Places listing. Other options for neighborhood stability and promotion may be explored through the neighborhood planning process for West Central Columbia, which is underway in the early spring of 2015.

Though not all homes in the area retain their integrity, the majority still suggest their original construction. If homeowners in the area do wish to improve their properties they are recommended to adhere to the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards of Rehabilitation. Guidelines for modification to older homes can be found at: http://www.cr.nps.gov/hps/tps/tax/rhb/.

Interactive Map of Local Historic Properties

Looking to uncover some information about local historic properties? Interested in developing your own historic property walking tour?

The Historic Preservation Commission maintains an interactive map of the City’s “Most Notable” and National Register properties, landmarks and districts! Click here to check out the map today!

interactive map screen shot

http://www.gocolumbiamo.com/Maps/Historical_Places/

Ghosts and Other Scary Tales Twilight Walk October 30

Ghosts TW

Don’t miss the last Twilight Walk of 2014!

Join the Historic Preservation Commission for a Twilight Walk emphasizing the ghosts, urban legends and dramatic fires that have impacted downtown’s history over the past 125 years.

Our tour host, retired Columbia Firefighter Steve Sapp, will bring his historical knowledge and professional expertise to our mobile discussion.
Be prepared for some surprises and unexpected twists and turns.
  • This event is free and open to the public (parental discretion is advised as some stories may be pretty scary). No registration is required.
  • Participants will meet IN THE LOBBY of  City Hall (corner of 8th & Broadway/701 E. Broadway) on Thursday, October 30.
  • Tours will begin promptly at 7:00 PM. Participants are advised to wear comfortable shoes and warm clothing. Costumes are allowed and flashlights are recommended.
  • This walk will last roughly 90 minutes.

For special accommodations, please contact Rachel Bacon at 573.874.7239 or ribacon@gocolumbiamo.com

2015 Most Notable Properties Program- Applications Requested from the Public!

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Since 1998, the City’s Historic Preservation Commission (HPC) has been recognizing Most Notable Historic Properties.  These properties are at least 50 years old, located within the City of Columbia corporate limits, and have architectural or historical characteristics which contribute to our City’s social and/or aesthetic resources. They may be endangered, derelict, recently restored, or nicely maintained. They may be modest or grand, hidden away or in public view. Stephens Stables, Columbia’s Brick Streets, the Blue Note, Ragtag Cinema/Uprise Bakery, Booches, Wabash Station, the Tiger Hotel, and Frederick Douglas High School are some of the 140 recognized Most Notable Properties.

 

What does it mean to be a Most Notable Property?

Application Process:

Applications are due (or post-marked) by Friday, November 21 at 5:00 PM. Applications may be mailed, dropped off, or emailed.

Community Development Department, City of Columbia, 701 E. Broadway, Columbia, MO 65201 or Planning@gocolumbiamo.com

Click here to download a printable application form.

For more information, please contact the Community Development Department at: (573) 874-7239

Past Recipients: 

Most Notable Properties 2011

Most Notable Properties 2012

Most Notable Properties 2013

Most Notable Properties 2014

Don’t forget to follow us on Facebook for weekly updates on HP topics! https://www.facebook.com/ColumbiaHPC

OCTOBER EVENTS SHOWCASE COLUMBIA’S UNIQUE AND SPOOKY HISTORY

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The Columbia Cemetery: A Historic Gem
Monday, October 13, 2014 › 7-8:15 p.m.

Columbia Public Library, Friends Room

Cindy Mustard and Sabra Tull Meyer, both sixth-generation Columbians and members of the Columbia Cemetery Board of Trustees, will talk about the cemetery’s unique past and the history buried within it. Take a visual tour of the monuments that reflect a roll call of Boone County’s pioneer families and influential citizens. Learn about the cemetery’s landscape architecture and art, including the fate of the early 20th century bandstand and much more. Co-sponsored by the City of Columbia’s Historic Preservation Commission.


30EBroadway

Cemetery Walking Tour

Monday, October 20, 2014 › 5:30-6:30 p.m.
Columbia Public Library, Lobby

Learn about the history of cemeteries, funeral practices and spooky superstitions during this atmospheric walking tour of the Columbia Cemetery. Meet in the lobby. Canceled if raining. All ages. Those 12 and under, please bring an adult with you.


ghostly figure in front of Saint Clair Hall

http://spotlight.ccis.edu/2009/10/mystery-of-gray-lady-revealed.html

Historic Preservation Commission to Host Twilight Walking Tour on Ghosts and Other Scary Tales October 30

Join the Historic Preservation Commission for a Twilight Walk emphasizing the ghosts, urban legends and dramatic fires that have impacted downtown’s history over the past 125 years.
Our tour host, retired Columbia Firefighter Steve Sapp, will bring his historical knowledge and professional expertise to our mobile discussion.
Be prepared for some surprises and unexpected twists and turns.
  • This event is free and open to the public (parental discretion is advised as some stories may be pretty scary). No registration is required.
  • Participants will meet at the City Hall Key Sculpture (corner of 8th & Broadway/701 E. Broadway).
  • Tours will begin promptly at 7:00 PM. Participants are advised to wear comfortable shoes and clothing.

For special accommodations, please contact Rachel Bacon at 573.874.7239 or ribacon@gocolumbiamo.com

The best way to know about upcoming events is to follow the Historic Preservation Commission’s blog via email or like our Facebook page:   www.comorevamp.wordpress.com and https://www.facebook.com/ColumbiaHP

Time for another walking tour: Architecture of Downtown Places of Worship Tour to be held Thursday, September 18!

church streetscape teaser pic

Which downtown house of worship has a streetscape feel between its sanctuary and its education building? Complete with replica gas lamps? And a ghost sign on the south side of its most recently acquired ancillary structure? Join the Historic Preservation Commission on our next Twilight Walk Through Downtown to find out.

The tour will be this Thursday evening (September 18) at 7:00 PM. Participants will learn more about Columbia’s historic Places of Worship, and how they fit into the historical narrative and urban fabric of Downtown Columbia. This tour will be led by a special guest, an architect well-versed in ecclesiastical architecture. The walking tour will focus on events, architecture, people, places, the evolution of building practices, technology, and trends, and so much more!

  • This event is free and open to the public (and is family-friendly). No registration is required.

  • Participants will meet at the City Hall Key Sculpture (corner of 8th & Broadway/701 E. Broadway).

  • Tours will begin promptly at 7:00 PM and will last roughly one hour plus time for questions. Participants are advised to wear comfortable shoes and clothing.

  • For special accommodations, or for more information, please contact City Planner Rachel Bacon at 573.874.7239.

2014 Twilight Walking Tours Schedule:

  • Thursday, July 31–An Engineer’s Guide to Brick Streets
  • Thursday, August 14–Historic Hotels and Theaters
  • Thursday, September 18–Architecture of Downtown Places of Worship
  • Thursday, October 30–Ghosts and Other Scary Tales

Upcoming Twilight Walking Tour: Historic Theaters and Hotels

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From Vaudeville, Talkies, and Taverns to Roots, Blues and BBQ, True/False Film Festival, and Tiger Fans.

The City of Columbia has always been a hotspot of hospitality and entertainment. Join the Historic Preservation Commission this Thursday evening (August 14) at 7:00 PM to learn more about Columbia’s historic Theaters and Hotels , and how they fit into the historical narrative and urban fabric of Downtown Columbia. The walking tour will focus on events, architecture, people, places, the evolution of building practices, technology, and trends, and so much more!

  • This event is free and open to the public (and is family-friendly). No registration is required.

  • Participants will meet at the City Hall Key Sculpture (corner of 8th & Broadway/701 E. Broadway).

  • Tours will begin promptly at 7:00 PM and will last roughly one hour plus time for questions. Participants are advised to wear comfortable shoes and clothing.

  • For special accommodations, or for more information, please contact City Planner Rachel Bacon at 573.874.7239.

2014 Twilight Walking Tours Schedule:

  • Thursday, July 31–An Engineer’s Guide to Brick Streets
  • Thursday, August 14–Historic Hotels and Theaters
  • Thursday, September 18–Architecture of Downtown Places of Worship
  • Thursday, October 30–Ghosts and Other Scary Tales

Upcoming Twilight Walking Tour- An Engineer’s Guide to Brick Streets

S. Glenwood Street, a brick paved street, in Columbia, MO

S. Glenwood in Columbia’s Old Southwest neighborhood was saved from being paved over with asphalt by residents. It was repaired in the 1990s and remains in excellent condition today.

Did you know that the City of Columbia’s brick streets are more than 100 years old? And that most of the red clay was sourced and manufactured within a 50 mile radius? 

Join the Historic Preservation Commission and professional engineer Patrick Earney this Thursday evening (July 31) at 7:00 PM to learn more about Columbia’s historic brick streets, and how they fit into the historical narrative and urban fabric of Downtown Columbia. The walking tour will focus on architecture, people, places, the evolution of building practices and materials, and so much more! 

  • This event is free and open to the public (and is family-friendly). No registration is required.

  • Participants will meet at the City Hall Key Sculpture (corner of 8th & Broadway/701 E. Broadway).

  • Tours will begin promptly at 7:00 PM and will last roughly one hour plus time for questions. Participants are advised to wear comfortable shoes and clothing.

  • For special accommodations, or for more information, please contact City Planner Rachel Bacon at 573.874.7239.

 

2014 Twilight Walking Tours Schedule:

  • Thursday, July 31–An Engineer’s Guide to Brick Streets
  • Thursday, August 14–Historic Hotels and Theatres
  • Thursday, September 18–Architecture of Downtown Places of Worship
  • Thursday, October 30–Ghosts and Other Scary Tales