Uncategorized

UPCOMING TWILIGHT WALKING TOUR- AN ENGINEER’S GUIDE TO BRICK STREETS

S. Glenwood Street, a brick paved street, in Columbia, MO

S. Glenwood in Columbia’s Old Southwest neighborhood was saved from being paved over with asphalt by residents. It was repaired in the 1990s and remains in excellent condition today.

S. Glenwood in Columbia’s Old Southwest neighborhood was saved from being paved over with asphalt by residents. It was repaired in the 1990s and remains in excellent condition today.

Did you know that the City of Columbia’s brick streets are more than 100 years old? And that most of the red clay was sourced and manufactured within a 50 mile radius?

Join the Historic Preservation Commission and professional engineer Patrick Earney next Saturday afternoon (October 15th) at 2:00 PM to learn more about Columbia’s historic brick streets, and how they fit into the historical narrative and urban fabric of Downtown Columbia. The walking tour will focus on architecture, people, places, the evolution of building practices and materials, and so much more!

This event is free and open to the public (and is family-friendly). No registration is required.

Participants will meet at the City Hall Key Sculpture (corner of 8th & Broadway/701 E. Broadway).

This tour will begin promptly at 2:00 PM and will last roughly one hour plus time for questions. Participants are advised to wear comfortable shoes and clothing.

For special accommodations, or for more information, please contact City Planner Mitch Skov at 573.874.7243.

Quirky Locals Tour: Saturday, November 21st, 2015.

The Quirky Locals’ Tour is here.  Join us Saturday noon, at Ragtag Cinema, for the season finale of our 2015 Downtown Walking Tour Program.
We begin with a short film at noon, and then take to the sidewalk for a leisurely stroll of about an hour’s length.  Enjoy Columbia’s character and history from a new perspective.  The walk will be less than a mile, and include several stops both indoors and outdoors.  Dress for the weather.
Hope to see you there.
November 21, 2015
12 noon
Inside Ragtag Cinema

Quirky Locals Tour: Saturday, November 21, 2015. Meet at Ragtag Cinema (10 Hitt Street) at 12:00 PM (Film to being promptly at noon).

All events are free, open to the public, and family-friendly. No registration is required. For more information, please call Planner Rusty Palmer at 573-874-7394 or email rwpalmer@gocolumbiamo.com.

 

Don’t forget to like our Facebook page!
https://www.facebook.com/ColumbiaHPC.

Vocabulary of Architecture Walking Tour: Saturday, November 7, 2015.

Did you know root of the word architecture is the Greek arkhitekton (“master builder”)?

This makes sense because the ancient Greeks were very skilled at architecture — from columns to stadiums and temples. Over time, the vocabulary of terms, according to the Getty Trust, for describing fine art, architecture, decorative arts, archival materials, and materials and methods of construction has grown to over 125,000 terms. Join the Historic Preservation Commission and local architect Sara Loe to learn more about the Vocabulary of Architecture in Columbia’s Historic Downtown District!

Vocabulary of Architecture: Saturday, November 7, 2015. Meet at the City Hall Key (701 E. Broadway) at 10:00 AM.

All events are free, open to the public, and family-friendly. No registration is required. For more information, please call Planner Rusty Palmer at 573-874-7394 or email rwpalmer@gocolumbiamo.com.

Ghosts and Scary Tales Walking Tour October 28!

Ghosts TWHistoric Preservation Commission Historic Walking Tour on Ghosts and Other Scary Tales

Wednesday, October 28 at 6:00 PM. Participants will meet at the Columns on the Francis Quadrangle (University of Missouri Campus).

Join the Historic Preservation Commission for a Historic Walk emphasizing the ghosts, urban legends and dramatic fires that have impacted downtown’s history over the past 125 years. Be prepared for some surprises and unexpected twists and turns. Parental discretion is advised as some stories may be quite scary For special accommodations, please contact Rachel Bacon at 573.874.7239 or ribacon@gocolumbiamo.com.

All events are free, open to the public, and family-friendly. No registration is required. The best way to know about upcoming events is to follow the Historic Preservation blog via email or like our Facebook page: http://www.comorevamp.wordpress.com and https://www.facebook.com/ColumbiaHPC.

……

Upcoming Tours:

Vocabulary of Architecture: Saturday, November 7, 2015. Meet at the City Hall Key (701 E. Broadway) at 10:00 AM.

Quirky Locals Tour: Saturday, November 21, starting from inside Ragtag Cinema (10 Hitt Street), Time Noon.

OCTOBER EVENTS SHOWCASE COLUMBIA’S UNIQUE AND SPOOKY HISTORY

30EBroadway

The Columbia Cemetery: A Historic Gem
Monday, October 13, 2014 › 7-8:15 p.m.

Columbia Public Library, Friends Room

Cindy Mustard and Sabra Tull Meyer, both sixth-generation Columbians and members of the Columbia Cemetery Board of Trustees, will talk about the cemetery’s unique past and the history buried within it. Take a visual tour of the monuments that reflect a roll call of Boone County’s pioneer families and influential citizens. Learn about the cemetery’s landscape architecture and art, including the fate of the early 20th century bandstand and much more. Co-sponsored by the City of Columbia’s Historic Preservation Commission.


30EBroadway

Cemetery Walking Tour

Monday, October 20, 2014 › 5:30-6:30 p.m.
Columbia Public Library, Lobby

Learn about the history of cemeteries, funeral practices and spooky superstitions during this atmospheric walking tour of the Columbia Cemetery. Meet in the lobby. Canceled if raining. All ages. Those 12 and under, please bring an adult with you.


ghostly figure in front of Saint Clair Hall

http://spotlight.ccis.edu/2009/10/mystery-of-gray-lady-revealed.html

Historic Preservation Commission to Host Twilight Walking Tour on Ghosts and Other Scary Tales October 30

Join the Historic Preservation Commission for a Twilight Walk emphasizing the ghosts, urban legends and dramatic fires that have impacted downtown’s history over the past 125 years.
Our tour host, retired Columbia Firefighter Steve Sapp, will bring his historical knowledge and professional expertise to our mobile discussion.
Be prepared for some surprises and unexpected twists and turns.
  • This event is free and open to the public (parental discretion is advised as some stories may be pretty scary). No registration is required.
  • Participants will meet at the City Hall Key Sculpture (corner of 8th & Broadway/701 E. Broadway).
  • Tours will begin promptly at 7:00 PM. Participants are advised to wear comfortable shoes and clothing.

For special accommodations, please contact Rachel Bacon at 573.874.7239 or ribacon@gocolumbiamo.com

The best way to know about upcoming events is to follow the Historic Preservation Commission’s blog via email or like our Facebook page:   www.comorevamp.wordpress.com and https://www.facebook.com/ColumbiaHP

Time for another walking tour: Architecture of Downtown Places of Worship Tour to be held Thursday, September 18!

church streetscape teaser pic

Which downtown house of worship has a streetscape feel between its sanctuary and its education building? Complete with replica gas lamps? And a ghost sign on the south side of its most recently acquired ancillary structure? Join the Historic Preservation Commission on our next Twilight Walk Through Downtown to find out.

The tour will be this Thursday evening (September 18) at 7:00 PM. Participants will learn more about Columbia’s historic Places of Worship, and how they fit into the historical narrative and urban fabric of Downtown Columbia. This tour will be led by a special guest, an architect well-versed in ecclesiastical architecture. The walking tour will focus on events, architecture, people, places, the evolution of building practices, technology, and trends, and so much more!

  • This event is free and open to the public (and is family-friendly). No registration is required.

  • Participants will meet at the City Hall Key Sculpture (corner of 8th & Broadway/701 E. Broadway).

  • Tours will begin promptly at 7:00 PM and will last roughly one hour plus time for questions. Participants are advised to wear comfortable shoes and clothing.

  • For special accommodations, or for more information, please contact City Planner Rachel Bacon at 573.874.7239.

2014 Twilight Walking Tours Schedule:

  • Thursday, July 31–An Engineer’s Guide to Brick Streets
  • Thursday, August 14–Historic Hotels and Theaters
  • Thursday, September 18–Architecture of Downtown Places of Worship
  • Thursday, October 30–Ghosts and Other Scary Tales

Heibel-March Drug Store

900-902 N. Rangeline Street

GetFileAttachment

The Heibel-March Drug Store resides at 902 N. Rangeline here in Columbia, Missouri. It is adjacent to Field Neighborhood Park and is one of the largest historic neighborhood commercial buildings left in Columbia. It was built ca. 1910 and was one of the most important commercial enterprises in this modest residential neighborhood.

The building is architecturally notable for the prism glass windows located above the open display windows of its large storefronts. Although prism glass tiles were popular for commercial storefronts in the early 20th century, few have survived to modern times, and they are now rare in Columbia.

From the Latin “lux” meaning “light” and “ferre,” meaning “to carry,” Luxfer prisms were a new twist on the Fresnel lenses that equipped lighthouses. Invented by James Pennycuick of Great Britain and patented in the U.S. in 1882, the lenses were once promoted as “The Century’s Triumph in Lighting” because of their ability to pull light deep into a space without creating an uncomfortable glare. Light passing through a Luxfer prism can be 5 to 50 times brighter than ordinary glass, but the prisms diffuse the light to create a comfortable light source that was ideal for commercial applications.

Luxfer prisms lighted the Heibel-March building for several proprietors, including the Heibel family’s grocery; March Pharmacy, Temple-Stephens General Store, as well as Curtis Black, who operated the store until 1955 with his wife Leona. Black recalls that many of his customers were workers in one of the neighborhood’s largest historic buildings-the Hamilton Brown Shoe Factory at 1123 Wilkes Blvd.

GetFileAttachment-1

In December of 1998, the City purchased approximately three quarters of an acre of land located on the northeast corner of the intersection of Wilkes and Rangeline Streets for the purpose of developing a new neighborhood park. The proposed park was adjacent to Field Elementary School (now the Columbia School District’s Center for Gifted Education/Early Childhood Education) and was intended to serve the recreational needs of this north central neighborhood. At the time the City of Columbia acquired the property, initial plans for the neighborhood park called for the demolition of the Heibel-March Building. The decision to preserve the building was arrived at after considering input from residents, businesses, schools and other interested groups using a series of park planning sessions, public hearings, as well as other sources. Ultimately, the City Council approved a master plan for the new park, which stopped the demolition of the building provided that City funds were not used to renovate or operate the building. Following approval of the master plan, the City, in September of 2000, entered into an agreement with Central Missouri Community Action who was acting on behalf and in the interest of the North Central Neighborhood association. That agreement allowed CMCA to acquire and renovate the Heibel-March Building for use as a neighborhood center for neighborhood groups, school programs, and other public events. Ownership of the building was transferred to CMCA for a fee of $10 along with a long-term lease of the land on which the building sits. Under the terms of the agreement, the renovation was to be completed and a certificate of occupancy issued within five years of the signing of the agreement. As the neighborhood effort to raise the funding necessary to restore the building in accordance with their plans (cost estimates for renovation ranged from $200,000 – $250,000) encountered substantial challenges, the agreement was eventually extended for a total of three additional years. In March of 2008, representatives of the “Corner Renovation Project”, as the project had become to known, announced that CMCA had withdrawn their support of the project and that all effort to raise funds to restore the building were being suspended. With no renovation having been completed, the City’s agreement with CMCA expired on September 19, 2008, and ownership of the building was transferred back to the City. No major improvements to the building other than some minor interior demolition and cleanup had occurred, and the building continued to be in need of extensive renovation.

Bob Grove, a business owner of Grove Construction, LLC, and real estate developer located in Columbia recently portrayed interest in the property. He has always loved old buildings and has enjoyed watching them transform back into buildings of nobility. His son Tony and he had been driving by the building every day for fifteen years and finally decided to make it their project. Their company, Grove Construction, has been a growing company over the past years and they were in need of a place for expansion. They wanted to stay close to the downtown area and saw the Heibel-March Building as a great potential new location. Obviously, drastic restoration efforts needed to be done. They submitted a restoration proposal regarding the March-Heibel Building, were approved, and began their restoration efforts soon after.

DSCN0552

After sixteen years of vacancy, the Heibel-March Building, now Grove Construction General Contracting, is completely restored and functions as an operating business. The restoration efforts put into the building were tremendous. Tony Grove remembers at the beginning of their restoration a tree was growing inside the building and there were dirt floors. Now, the inside is completely redone and modernized.

IMG_5280

Grove Construction’s entry room, beautifully restored (no more dirt floors!)

IMG_5277

Above: One of several offices inside the building

Below: Grove Construction conference room

IMG_5281

Although the building now has a completely new interior, the Grove’s still wanted to maintain the building’s outside historic look. They put on a new roof, replaced all the windows, inserted all new outside lighting but were able to keep its original historic structure.

DSCN0553

DSCN0557

The mural that was painted on the side of the building still remains as well!

 

 

113 West Blvd. N.- Part I (The Exterior)

Nearly 5,000 vehicles and a few hundred bicyclists and pedestrians travel past Patrick Earney’s house at 113 West Boulevard North every day. Those that pass by on a regular basis over the past few months have watched Earney steadily renovate his 1,050 sq. ft. 1940 Tudor-inspired brick home. Now that the thoughtful addition is nearly done, the attention to every detail and design consideration, combined with the careful reuse of original and salvaged materials, makes the addition look as though it was there the day the home was built.

photo (5)The “before” picture is shown above. Notable architectural elements include brick arches or lunettes above each door, decorative limestone masonry infused into the red brick, and original windows.

When faced with the needs of an expanding family, Earney decided to maintain the historic integrity of his home, but squeeze in a little extra living space on the same 1940s footprint. It also helped that as a professional engineer and member of the Historic Preservation Commission, Earney was able to take on the majority of the design and construction work himself with a little help from friend and fellow HP Commissioner Robert Tucker. The plans Earney drew for the project may be downloaded here: TPE Garage 130904.

“I love my home and will live here forever. With a few tweaks to the floor plan, and a little extra space, I knew I could upgrade the functionality of my home but maintain its historic elements. Old homes have a charm and personality that can’t be replicated, and it was important that this addition look like it was always there.” –Earney

The new addition has gone along mostly to plan, with some upgrades and enhancements made along the way to turn this two-bedroom and two-bath home into a three-bedroom and four-bath home:

  • The original garage has been shortened to include an extra powder room  and mudroom area off the kitchen to the rear of the house
  • A master bedroom, bathroom and closet have been built on top of the garage and a front dormer window and two rear windows were added for natural light
  • A back door and deck will connect the back door to the back yard
  • Overall, about 300 sq. feet of living space will be added

photo (4)

The garage was removed, as shown above (Earney is to the right), and a new foundation for the garage and addition was poured, as shown below. The exterior brick from the north side- where the addition would go- has been removed for re-use on the front of the addition.

IMG_1912 IMG_1936photo (3)

The picture below shows the new garage and master suite framed in and ready for brick, siding and shingles. Note how the new roof line seamlessly blends with the height of the original roof. photo (2)The picture below shows the exterior of the new addition nearly complete. One of the best ways for historic renovations to maintain the property’s historic integrity is to use original materials. The bricks removed from the original garage were reused, and the extra facade space above the garage allowed for Earney to incorporate the arched lunette design used above the doorways to visually enhance the space above the garage. This provides visual interest and continuity between the addition and the existing architecture.

IMG_2196

All of the new siding, windows soffits and fascia will be matched to the original materials, and painted to provide a perfect color match between the existing and new wood trim.

The garage door will be re-installed, and a new driveway will be poured next.photo (1)

The rear window shown in the picture below now provides light into a bathroom instead of a garage. The back door will provide access to the back yard once a landing and stairs are built.  Two new windows matched to the original windows provide light and a view of the back yard to the master bathroom and bedroom addition.

photo (20)

“Older homes have great lots, locations, and architecture– something that new construction just can’t match. Property owners should not be afraid to make small changes to their historic homes to meet modern needs because it isn’t difficult to do it right. This addition enhances the existing architecture of the home by building upon its unique architectural elements and using appropriate building materials. The effect is subtle and enhanced, not jarring and obvious. Care must be taken, however, to ensure that any addition is proportional to the house. I had to compromise on some internal functionality to ensure that the addition looked like original construction” — Earney

Interested in taking on your own project? The Historic Preservation Commission provides technical assistance to property owners wanting to renovate or rehabilitate while maintaining their home’s historic charm.

Great progress has been made on the exterior of this lovely home, and the inside has been transformed as well! Stay tuned for Part II for a tour of the interior of the addition to 113 West Blvd. N.!